bank with frank header

Listen to what our customers say

Black Bear Graphics owners Nate and Amy Morin, with FSB’s Mike Mansir.

When growing a business, it’s good to have a banker you can call to get what you need to make it happen.
“Mike is our go-to guy whenever we need something,” says Amy Morin, who runs Black Bear Graphics with her husband Nate. Just recently, they expanded to a larger location on Farmington Falls Road.
“Franklin has been with us from the beginning. We couldn’t have done it without them.”

Phill & Jan McIntyre at Skye Theatre Performing Arts Center in Carthage with FSB’s Tom Sawyer

“We wouldn’t be here without Franklin Savings Bank,” says Phill. The expansion of his Skye Theatre in 2008 proved to be a challenging time, economically. Through the hurdles, Franklin stuck with Skye and the McIntyres. “Franklin Savings looks beyond the numbers and looks at the project. That’s important.”
Now, the unique Carthage theater that specializes in live Celtic music, can boast of its rating in Yankee Magazine’s Best of New England list.

Spandits

Spandits!™ founders, Sarah Doscinski and Kelley Cullenberg with FSB’s Beckie Bowering.

When Sarah Doscinski and Kelley Cullenberg decided to go into business manufacturing and selling SPANDITS!™ “athletic apparel with attitude,” opening their business accounts at Franklin Savings Bank was a pretty natural choice.
While they are well-poised for growth now, the early stages of forming a business were a little challenging.
“Beckie Bowering found a way to open doors for us,” said Kelley. “They have a very sincere interest in our business,” added Sarah.

Moose Alley

Moose Alley's Nancy Bessey with FSB’s Leeanna Wilbur

When Nancy Bessey envisioned bringing “Rock, Roll and Bowl” to Rangeley, she knew it was an ambitious project for a small community.
Fortunately, Franklin Savings Bank could appreciate her vision. “They are part of your team, looking at it from a business development perspective. They are interested in projects that make the area more economically sound.”
Now, not only is Moose Alley a Rangeley hot spot for music and entertainment in all seasons, it was selected as one of the 20 best designed bowling centers in the world by Bowlers Journal International. “It’s pretty amazing, really.”

Jeff Hawksley, Lindsay Richards and Jeanne Thorvaldsen of the Rangeley Health and Wellness Center, with FSB’s Leeanna Wilbur

“They are great support for us and our community. It is a neighborhood bank where they know you by name and that is so important,” says Jeanne Thorvaldsen, Director of Administration.

“FSB has been a staunch and loyal supporter of the Health and Wellness Center since the beginning of the program,” adds Jeff Hawksley, CPT Fitness Director.

Mosher's Seafood

Tawnya Clough, Mosher’s Seafood
Farmington, with FSB’s Mike Mansir

Taking over an established hometown business meant Tawnya Clough had some pretty big shoes to fill. Tapping into the hometown bank made the process easier, particularly when it came to helping craft a custom financing package that works for everyone.

“I really get the feeling that everybody cares about their customers, which is extremely important to me.”

 

Bankery

Michael Hunt & Matthew DuBois, The Bankery,
Skowhegan Fleuriste & Formalwear, with FSB's Sally Dwyer

While the idea of opening a bakery in an old bank and living above it seemed far-fetched to other bankers, FSB’s Sally Dwyer was enchanted with the idea. So it’s no surprise that she was the first one Michael and Matthew called when they wanted to expand their successful business to take in the floral shop next door.

Despite difficult economic times, the business has blossomed from three to 14 employees and, with formalwear and invitations, has become a one-stop wedding destination.

“We’re growing in a recession so it makes us feel hopeful when the economy comes back we’ll be able to roll with it,” says Matthew.

“The tellers keep me coming back because they are super friendly. You don’t get that everywhere,” says Michael.

 

Black Diamond

Ron & Rick Savage, Savage Contracting Inc. & Black Diamond Steak House, among others,
with FSB’s Jen Merrill and Rich Allen.

“I trust the bank and that they’re looking out for us. We’re working guys. They help us keep things straight. I can call Rich or Jen and I feel like I have an employee right there,” says Ron, who runs the businesses with his wife, Cindy, and brother, Rick.

“We have the same philosophy as Franklin: Just work hard and great things will happen.”

 

Cayford Orchards

Heather & Jason Davis, Cayford Orchards, Skowhegan

“There’s not enough time in the world to tell you why ‘I Bank with Frank,’” says Heather.
While other banks weren’t willing to invest in the couple’s dream for revitalizing their generational family orchard, FSB said “Yes,” says Jason. “They put a little more faith in us.”

Since then, they have made Cayford Orchards a destination for fall family outings and Maine-made food and crafts shopping. They just put in a new Cider House that enables them to press their apples on site.

 

Dupuis

Andy Dupuis, Andy Dupuis Towing & Salvage, Andy with son, Andy, grandson, Issac, and FSB’s Diane Perry

Andy Dupuis has Banked with Frank since the bank came to the River Valley in 1968. “I’ve been very satisfied. We built this business and Franklin has been a big plus for us. They helped us through it and we’ve been successful,” he said. And Diane Perry, the branch manager, “She’s a peach! I’ve known her family forever.”

 

Lakeside Convenience

Paul and Lynn Noyes, Lakeside Convenience & Marina, Rangeley, with FSB's Leeanna Wilbur

FSB’s Rangeley Manager, Leeanna Wilbur, helped Lynn and Paul Noyes maneuver the complex process for Small Business Administration loans and make their dream a reality.
“We knew this was a perfect opportunity for us, but if not for Leeanna, it would never have happened. The SBA piece of the puzzle was extremely difficult. She helped not only from a business standpoint, but as a friend. Leeanna’s way beyond a banker,” says Lynn.

 

Jellystone Park at Yonder Hill

Allen York, Jellystone Park at Yonder Hill, Madison, with FSB's Sally Dwyer

To run a growing and successful business in a down economy, it helps to be smarter than the average bear!

For Alan York, that means becoming the only officially licensed Jellystone Park in Maine and Banking with Frank.

“The girls take good care of me. They do my paperwork for me and keep me out of trouble.”

 

Narrow Gauge

John Moore at his new Snack Shack with FSB’s Rich Allen

“As I have gotten older, being part of the community is more important to me. There’s no one more involved in the community than Franklin Savings Bank,” says John Moore, owner of the Narrow Gauge Theater and the upcoming Snack Shack at the UMF soccer field. “I really appreciate what Franklin Savings Bank does for Franklin County and Farmington. They give back. They’ve earned our business.”



Sugarloaf Ambulances

Ron Morin, Sugarloaf Ambulance/Rescue Vehicles, Wilton, with FSB’s Mike Mansir

Building custom ambulance and rescue vehicles is like building a house on the back of a chassis. It’s a big job but not one Ron Morin’s willing to trust to a big bank.
“It’s the personal touch,” said Morin. Franklin Savings Bank is “easy to work with, easy to talk to. And they make things happen.”

 

Professional Vehicles

Bill Gates, Professional Vehicles Corp., with FSB’s Rich Allen

“From Day One, we’ve been with Franklin Savings Bank. It’s a bonus to have local decisions. Rich knows our business very well,” says Bill, whose 16-year-old custom vehicle business started out in his basement and now employs 18 in its new Rumford facility.


Celebrations

Stephen and Kathy Boivin and Shanna Dorey at Celebrations Unlimited

When Kathy Boivin and Shanna Dorey decided to take the plunge into opening Celebrations Unlimited, the easiest part was deciding where to go for financing.
“I really like that Franklin Savings Bank is a small, hometown bank. I go in and they all know me,” said Shanna. “It’s a banker and a friend,” added Kathy.
Stephen Boivin, Kathy’s husband who owns the building, said he has called on his Franklin Lender for every project he’s ever done. “He makes it easy.”

 

Howie's Welding

Tim DeMillo and Mary Howes with Jay Branch Manager Lorna Niedner

Howie’s Welding and Fabrication Inc. didn’t always bank with Franklin. When the Jay company was smaller and needed to build an addition to grow the business, their old banker wouldn’t fund it. They were pleased to find Franklin was willing to invest in Howie’s. As the business has grown, so has the relationship with Franklin Savings Bank.
“Franklin Savings is like a partner with us, like family,” says Mary Howes, president of Howie's Welding, who runs the company with her husband and operations manager, Tim DeMillo.
But the value of a good banker goes beyond helping a company grow when times are good. Business can be cyclical and sometimes there are slow periods. “It is feast or famine. Franklin has always helped us through the slow spells,” says Mary.

 

Subway

Subway owners Pete and Carla Dougeneck with Skowhegan Branch Manager Sally Dwyer

Why bank at Franklin?
"Franklin was the bank that listened to the little guy," says Pete Dougeneck, who runs the Skowhegan Subway restaurant with his wife Carla and three children. Pete and Carla searched to find a town that was growing but still had traditional values. Skowhegan fit the bill.
"The big banks found it hard to believe we could give up big city business for small town Skowhegan." Franklin's Commercial Lending VP Mike Mansir and Skowhegan Branch Manager Sally Dwyer understood. "I knew right then and there it was going to be a pleasure. It's all about family to us," said Pete.

SAVES

Franklin Customer Service VP Dee LaPlant with Judy Rawlings of SAVES

Why bank at Franklin?

It came up at a SAVES board meeting. One member asked, "Why don't we bank locally?" Once upon a time, the bank that served Sexual Assault Victims Emergency Services Inc. in Farmington was local. But it had long since sold out to a larger out of state financial institution.

So Judy Rawlings, Executive Director at SAVES, switched the nonprofit organization's deposit and line of credit accounts to the Hometown Bank. "We're a small organization. Our business isn't going to make a big difference to Franklin Savings Bank, but we try to do as much local business as possible," says Rawlings.

"Everyone at Franklin was great. It was easy to make the switch."

 

Thorndike

Karen and Robert Thorndike with FSB Commercial Lender, Vice President Mike Mansir

Bob and Karen Thorndike have plenty to do running Thorndike and Sons excavating and trucking, Maine-ly Trees logging and woodlot management and their 120-head family Angus farm in Phillips. They don't need headaches from their bank.

That's why they bank at Franklin Savings Bank. They had been with another bank that had changed hands a few times. Their financials were good but Bob was told the bank wanted larger or smaller businesses and he had 30 days to pay off his loans. “I was in between what they wanted to deal with.”Another bank told Bob his business was welcome as long as times are good. “You never know what’s coming at you in this business, weather, market conditions... Sometimes in the spring, we go three months without working. We need a bank that’s here for us when we aren’t making money.”Things were different at Franklin. “They said, ‘If you’re here for us in the good times, we’ll be here for you in the bad times.’ If you’re having hard times, you need a bank that will work with you and Franklin Savings Bank always has.”

 

Ted Berry

Matthew, Linda and Jim Timberlake with Franklin's Lorna Niedner

Sometimes you need something and you need it quick.

Once upon a time, while on a business trip in Detroit, Matt Timberlake needed to buy an expensive vacuum truck. At the time, the family industrial cleaning business, Ted Berry Co. in Livermore, used to bank with another bank, but that bank wouldn't return their calls.
Back home, Jim Timberlake called Franklin Savings Bank and received the backing needed to make the purchase quickly. The Timberlakes switched all their accounts to their Hometown Banker and have been happy ever since."It's not an everyday thing, but sometimes you need a quick response," says Linda Timberlake, whose father started the business in 1972. "When I need money and I need it now, I don't want to jump through too many hoops."

 

Vining

Commercial Lender Mike Mansir with Kevin Vining

As far as Kevin Vining is concerned, Mike Mansir is Franklin Savings Bank’s Best Asset.
With Mike’s help, he bought E.L. Vining & Son from his father 22 years ago. Since then, it’s grown 32 times in size. The Farmington contractor now employs between 60 and 70 people.“He’s always been great to deal with, through good times and bad. That’s what makes a great relationship, knowing you can count on him regardless,” says Kevin.

 

Puiia

Tom Puiia chats with Franklin's Rumford-Mexico Branch Manager Diane Perry and Commercial Lender Rich Allen.

The Lumber business has been a major part of the Puiia family since 1952, when Tom Puiia's parents, Nick and Dot, built their Rumford lumber yard. Much has changed since then. The Rumford yard is gone and, since 2004, Tom has been running a new yard and store in Mexico. Where did he go for financing? Franklin Savings Bank, of course.
"Why would anyone bank anywhere else?" says Tom, owner of Puiia Lumber Co. Inc. "I've always banked with Franklin, ever since I started working for my father in the 1970s. It's a fun place to go. I usually know everybody."

 

Winderosa

Winderosa CEO & Production Manager Jay Windover, General Manager Lolisa Bonney, Franklin Lender Rich Allen, Winderosa VP Research and Development Rachel Carignan, Franklin President & CEO Peter Judkins, and Rumford-Mexico Branch Manager Diane Perry.

Sometimes, you just need to look out the window to let a brainstorm in.

In the early days, when Winderosa was a campground, Rachel Carignan noticed the many snowmobiles that whizzed by. The idea of selling snowmobile parts made a lot of sense. Over time, Winderosa has transitioned to manufacturing snowmobile gaskets and sales have grown steadily since 1990.The family-owned business in Peru has always looked ahead. But in order to get where they want to go, "You need a bank. You need the best," says Rachel.

Winderosa's banker is Franklin Savings Bank. "We look at the bank as helping us, not just taking our money. They come and talk to us and find out what we need," says Lolisa Bonney. "When we need a piece of equipment, they understand our situation and go to bat for us," adds Jay Windover.

 

Kurt's

Kurt Moody with Mike Mansir

"I don't know why people would bank anywhere else."

"I've never done business with anyone else," says Kurt Moody, who recently launched Kurt's Lawn and Property Care. "Whenever I need something, I call Mike and I get it. I don't have to jump through hoops."

Kurt believes he has had just about every product Franklin Savings Bank offers over the many years he has been a partner in a construction business. He had always dreamed of owning his own lawn care business and when the time came to put the plan together, he brought it to his Hometown Banker.

 

M&H Logging

Scott Millbury, David Haley and Ken Hale with Rangeley Branch Manager Leeanna Wilbur

Consistency. Local control. Local service.

These are things that make a difference to M & H Logging and Construction. The Rangeley-based company has seen many other bankers come and go since it began operation in 1981. But through it all, owners Scott Millbury and David Haley and general manager Ken Haley have known they could count on their Hometown Banker to be there when it counts.

“If ever there is a problem, Leeanna is there,” says Scott, of Rangeley Branch Manager Leeanna Wilbur. “A small bank has more local control. Leeanna doesn’t need to call out of state for approval,” said David.

“Leeanna showed a lot of interest in our needs, the ups and downs of our business. She’s able to work with us and not send in someone from away,” said Ken. “She cared and wanted to do business with us.”

 

Foothills

Mike Mansir with Bill Marceau

It takes a Community Banker to know the Community.

Recognizing potential in people is something that sets Franklin Savings Bank apart from other financial institutions. When Bill Marceau was “the new guy” in town, most lenders didn’t give a second look to his ambitious projects. Mike Mansir of Franklin Savings Bank did and he hasn’t looked back. Bill’s bustling Foothills Management now handles hundreds of rental units in dozens of buildings and he continues to count on Franklin Savings Bank for flexible, responsive, convenient and, best of all, friendly banking.

‘Franklin Savings Bank has been a great partner for Foothills Management,” says Bill.


Erik Designs

Erik and Cheryl Dickson with Franklin's Rich Allen

It was Franklin Savings Bank's "can-do" attitude that clinched the deal for Erik and Cheryl Dickson of Erik Designs.

When they were expanding their sign and graphics business 12 years ago, some banks stalled in giving them an answer.

Our banker said "'We'll take care of you' and he did," says Cheryl. "For a young couple just starting out and scared to death of a big debt, he made us feel comfortable."

"It's our Hometown Bank. You talk to the people who make the decisions," added Erik.

 

Rowe's

Bob and Karen Rowe with Mike Mansir

"Franklin Savings Bank believed in us from the beginning of the whole loan process," says Bob Rowe, who recently opened Rowe Auto Service on Farmington Falls Road. "It was 'Go' from the moment we met Mike," says Karen Rowe, of commercial lender Mike Mansir.

"Never once did they make us think this wasn’t going to work or the loan wouldn’t go through. Mike stayed in touch and was always accommodating. We feel this is personal banking at its best and thank Franklin Savings Bank sincerely for helping make our dream of owning our own business come true.”

 

Janace's

Jim Jannace, Deanna Lemieux and Leeanna Wilbur of Franklin Savings Bank look over Jannace’s new custom embroidery operation in Rangeley.

Rangeley is a classic small town, comfortable and easy-going. For small business owners, those traits are just important for their bankers.

It’s one reason Jim Jannace, owner of Nancy’s Gifts and Jannace’s Backwoods Clothing and Custom Embroidery, chooses Franklin Savings Bank.

“It’s a small town bank. I’ve always felt very comfortable at Franklin Savings Bank. They make us feel at home,” says Jim. “When you call down there, everybody knows who you are. You can call Leeanna anytime you need help.”

 

Puroclean

Roger and Melinda Soucy

When you’re starting a small business, working with the “Hometown Banker” is definitely the way to go.

Just ask Roger and Melinda Soucy, who own the local Puroclean franchise. Having run the business for five years for his parents, Roger knew the ins and outs of fire and water damage restoration and reconstruction, but business financing was a new path in life. He took his financial advisor’s recommendation and went to see Franklin Savings Bank.

“We’re very comfortable at Franklin Savings Bank.”

 

Northern Lights

Todd Richard and Marty Farnum with Franklin's Peter Judkins and Mike Mansir

Todd Richard and Marty Farnum love what they do. After all, their business, Northern Lights Hearth and Sports in Farmington, has become the place to go for people who want to make informed purchases of woodstoves and outdoor gear.

But previous financial dealings took the fun out of it. “We were supposed to feel good, but we felt like we’d been through the wringer,” said Marty. The rate seemed low at first, but by the time they closed the loan, more documents were needed, requiring additional legal work, and the price tag for out-of-pocket expenses grew substantially.

They decided to give Franklin Savings Bank a shot. “It was nice. It was simple, quiet and it was done,” said Marty. And working with the only locally-owned bank in Franklin County means more than quick response from their bankers. It means supporting local business. “We rely on our community to support us and we support the community,” said Todd. “That’s the key.”

 

Ellis Pond

Dennis Daniel with Rich Allen

Running a small business was nothing new to Dennis Daniel. The Rumford native had owned or operated several over the years. But it wasn’t until he sat down with Rich Allen of Franklin Savings Bank to work out the financing for his new venture, Ellis Pond Variety, that he understood how much easier it is to do business with a community bank.
"Easy in, easy out. We were very relaxed. You didn’t get that corporate feeling,” he said, noting that he felt like just a number to the big bank where he used to do business. This deal needed to be closed very quickly and Dennis was surprised when Rich was able to pull it together within a month. “Everyone was amazed at how fast it went.”

 

Pidack's

Bob Pidacks with Rich Allen and Peter Judkins

Bob Pidacks is a “Hands-On” kind of guy.

He knows heavy equipment and how to successfully run R.S. Pidacks Inc. in Livermore, the only three-stage portable rock crushing plant for hire in Maine.

Since he was 19 and bought his first bulldozer, Pidacks learned he can count on Franklin Savings Bank to work out the financing details.
“I hate paperwork. What I do is make this machine run. They’re best at financing. I say ‘this is what I want to do’ and they take care of it,” says Pidacks. “Franklin Savings Bank simplifies things. They help you get through the red tape.”

 

Marshall's Machine

Fred and Lisa Marshall

Running Marshall's Machine in Skowhegan has taught Fred and Lisa Marshall one thing: When it comes to small business banking, bigger isn't better.

"When the bank we were with was bought by a bigger bank, they didn't care about us," says Lisa. "Now they care. When you get big, they want you back, but when you're small and need a bank, they don't want to help you grow."

"The other bank kept growing until you couldn't talk to them," says Fred.

Over the past decade, the couple has gone from one employee to seven. At the same time, they have gone from having a few personal loans with Franklin Savings Bank to moving all of their personal and business accounts to Western Maine's Hometown Banker.

"Franklin Savings Bank is easy to do business with," says Fred.

 

One Stop

Gary Collins and Renee DiConzo

When it comes to running a convenience store, the key word is “convenience,” for the owners as well as the customers.

That’s why Mexico One Stop owners Gary Collins and Renee DiConzo choose Franklin Savings Bank as their bank. “Others have knocked, but we’re not switching,” says Gary.

“Whatever we need is just a phone call away. You pick up the phone and it is taken care of instantly. The service is outstanding,” he added.

“Everything is easy with Franklin Savings Bank,” says Renee.